12 Rules of Animation by  

7 Photojournalism Tips by award winning Reuters photojournalist Damir Sagolj 

Independent animator icon Bill Plympton share some lessons for telling animated stories vía Co.Create
“You should always start with a good idea. A good idea is so important to a successful film. You don’t even have to be a great illustrator or a great artist; if you have a wonderful idea, you are way ahead”. 
“Doing the storyboard is the most important part because almost all the information for the finished film is in it There’s the story, of course, the editing, the character design, the backgrounds, the movement”.
Read more 
(vía transmediatic)

Independent animator icon Bill Plympton share some lessons for telling animated stories vía Co.Create

“You should always start with a good idea. A good idea is so important to a successful film. You don’t even have to be a great illustrator or a great artist; if you have a wonderful idea, you are way ahead”. 

“Doing the storyboard is the most important part because almost all the information for the finished film is in it There’s the story, of course, the editing, the character design, the backgrounds, the movement”.

Read more 

(vía transmediatic)

(via transmediatic)

10 Screenwriting tips by Billy Wilder
The audience is fickle.
Grab ‘em by the throat and never let ‘em go.
Develop a clean line of action for your leading character.
Know where you’re going.
The more subtle and elegant you are in hiding your plot points, the better you are as a writer.
If you have a problem with the third act, the real problem is in the first act.
A tip from Lubitsch: Let the audience add up two plus two. They’ll love you forever.
In doing voice-overs, be careful not to describe what the audience already sees. Add to what they’re seeing.
The event that occurs at the second act curtain triggers the end of the movie.
The third act must build, build, build in tempo and action until the last event, and then—that’s it. Don’t hang around.

10 Screenwriting tips by Billy Wilder

  1. The audience is fickle.
  2. Grab ‘em by the throat and never let ‘em go.
  3. Develop a clean line of action for your leading character.
  4. Know where you’re going.
  5. The more subtle and elegant you are in hiding your plot points, the better you are as a writer.
  6. If you have a problem with the third act, the real problem is in the first act.
  7. A tip from Lubitsch: Let the audience add up two plus two. They’ll love you forever.
  8. In doing voice-overs, be careful not to describe what the audience already sees. Add to what they’re seeing.
  9. The event that occurs at the second act curtain triggers the end of the movie.
  10. The third act must build, build, build in tempo and action until the last event, and then—that’s it. Don’t hang around.
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